HEP C IS THE
LEADING CAUSE
OF
LIVER CANCER

Hepatitis C (Hep C) is a serious, blood-borne disease that can cause cirrhosis (severe scarring) of the liver. Anything that causes cirrhosis—heavy alcohol use, obesity, smoking, diabetes, and Hep C—can increase the risk of liver cancer. But Hep C remains the leading cause.

LIVER CANCER
IS ON THE RISE

Deaths from cancer, 1990–2015

From 1990 to 2015, deaths from liver cancer in the US increased by 60%, while deaths from other cancers decreased by 26%.

FROM 2008 TO 2012:

~124,000 Americans were
diagnosed with liver cancer.*

Of those, roughly 64.5%
were Baby Boomers.

*This figure includes intrahepatic bile duct cancer.

HOW DOES HEP C
AFFECT THE LIVER?

If you have Hep C, it can start to damage the liver
right away, even if you have no symptoms.

Here is how liver damage progresses as a result of Hep C:

  • Hep C causes inflammation (swelling) of the liver, which causes scarring (fibrosis) of the liver over time.
  • When scarring becomes severe, it can block blood flow to the liver.
  • Once scarring is severe enough to block blood flow, it is called cirrhosis. Cirrhosis keeps the liver from working as it should, and can cause permanent liver damage.

The good news is: Hep C can be
cured. The sooner it is treated,
the
better the chances are for being
cured. Learn more >

Cure means the Hep C virus is not detected in the blood 3 months after treatment is completed.

WHY IS THE LIVER
SO IMPORTANT?

Your body’s largest internal organ, the liver performs a variety of
functions in order to keep you healthy.

Some of its most vital jobs are:

  • Storing nutrients from food
    and releasing them
    into the
    bloodstream when needed
  • Helping to manage
    blood clotting
  • Breaking down alcohol and
    drugs and
    removing waste
    from the blood
  • Producing bile to
    help digest fats

THINGS THAT CAN SPEED UP
LIVER DAMAGE

How fast Hep C progresses varies from person to person. By the time symptoms appear, liver damage is often already advanced.

Many factors can affect how quickly Hep C progresses:

  • Alcohol use
  • Age
  • Weight
     
  • Having HIV or
    AIDS

THE STAGES OF
LIVER DAMAGE

Knowing how far fibrosis (scarring) in your liver has progressed can help your Hep C Specialist determine which course of treatment is best for you.

Your Hep C Specialist can determine your
fibrosis score in a few different ways:

  1. Blood tests
  2. Ultrasound
  3. Liver biopsy

Scores from these tests are
numbered F0-F4:

  • F0
  • F1
  • F2
  • F3
  • F4

F0

(None)

The liver is healthy

F1

(Mild Fibrosis)

Early stages of liver damage with slight scarring

F2

(Moderate Fibrosis)

Scar tissue starts to form

F3

(Severe Fibrosis)

Blood flow in the liver has been affected

F4

(Cirrhosis)

There is so much scar tissue that the liver is not able to work as it should

TAKE ACTION

Remember, if you have Hep C,
it can be cured.

GET TESTED.

The only way to know for sure if you have Hep C
is to get tested.

Find out why you
should get tested. >

DIAGNOSED WITH HEP C?

We’re here to light the way with helpful information and a Hep C Specialist appointment guide.

Register now. >